In their own words | 12 April

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Compiled by Christina Hansen and Deanna Yourell

 

We’ve kept our ears to the ground and brought you the most quotable quotes from the last 24 hours. Here’s today’s action through the voices of those who matter most:

 

Table tennis player Melissa Tapper reflects on the key to her and Michelle Bromley’s win on Thursday:

 

“Michelle! She was definitely the star performer today.”

 

Table tennis player Michelle Bromley talks about their performance in the doubles:

 

“I think that was the best doubles we’ve played together. It was really important to keep spinning balls on the table, which we did well.”

 

Shooter Laetisha Scanlan on being the defending champion going into Friday’s trap contest:

 

“It’s my birthday tomorrow, so hopefully I’ll give myself a birthday present. Friday the 13th will hopefully be good luck for me.”

 

Athlete Brianna Beahan describes how she feels after a personal best performance of 13.02 in the 100m hurdles:

 

“That was probably the most nervous I’ve been for a long time. But I got out there and executed and, apart from the middle part (of the race), I’m happy. It was fast and I’m glad it’s over, so I won’t be as nervous for the final (on 13 April). I want a medal.”

 

Athlete Matt Denny on how he has been recovering from the hammer throw and preparing for the discus event:

 

“I have been watching a lot of Netflix, sitting in the pool, having coffees, sleeping, eating, chilling, just simple stuff. We’ve done all the work, it’s now all about just staying relaxed.”

 

Diver Matthew Carter reflects on how the conditions affected his performance:

 

“The sun sometimes gets in your eyes, but because we’ve been training and doing a lot of work out here, we’ve had the upper hand against everyone else and it doesn’t really affect us that much. It doesn’t really affect me too much because I’ve just done a lot out here.”

 

Athlete Michelle Jenneke on setting a season best (SB) of 12.99 in the 100m hurdles event:

 

“I executed the first part of my race well and, after that, I just tried to stay on pace with the first few girls because I knew I was in the faster heat. I saw the times from the first race, so I knew what I had to run and I was comfortable. I wasn’t too concerned about not being in the top two (automatic qualifying positions).

“There’s still a bit more left for the final. I broke 13 seconds and I was surprised by that. I haven’t done that in over a year but I feel I can go faster.”

 

Wrestler Connor Evans discusses his semi-final against Kumar Sushil:

 

“The gameplan was to go in and put pressure on him and I think I did that for about 10 seconds! But as soon as he had a grip it was almost impossible to escape. It was pretty painful, I’m not going to lie. The guy’s a world champ, he has superhuman strength.

“In Australia we don’t get too many Olympic medals (in wrestling) so to even share the mat with someone of that calibre is an experience I’ll never forget. He’s a superstar.”

 

Bowler Barrie Lester on the men’s fours victory on Thursday:

 

“It was a brilliant game. All eight players contributed on both sides. We were set up at 10-6 at the 11th end and then they came back at us. We have a lot of respect for Northern Ireland and they are a great team to play. They play well and are good to play. We all pulled together and were so lucky on the final end.”

 

Para-bowler Josh Thornton describes the feeling of winning gold for Australia:

 

“Pride, emotion, joy. A whirlwind of emotions.

“I have been dreaming of this for a long time. Any kid who loves his sport dreams of representing their country and succeeding, and to tick off our biggest goal in our sport in terms of a Commonwealth gold medal, dreams do come true.”

 

Gymnast Dani Prince on her long and successful career:

 

“It has been a long ride. This is my 16th year of competing in gymnastics so it’s been a really long road to get here. I really hope that my journey has inspired some younger girls to believe that just because they finish high school or because they turn 17 or 18 doesn’t mean that they have to retire. If they are passionate and they have the drive, they can keep going well into their late 20s.”

 

Gymnast Enid Sung discusses the possibility of Australia winning a medal in the team final:

 

“We really want to add to that Australian medal tally. It would be phenomenal. I think if our team pulls it together, we might have a chance. To do it in front of the home crowd has been a blessing. It’s just incredible. To top it up with a medal will be the icing on the cake.”

 

Athlete Kathryn Mitchell talks about setting a national and Games record (68.92m) and her preparations for GC2018:

 

“I knew what I had to do and hoped I could do it. I did it tonight and what a place to deliver it.

“Last year was a tough year. I had to change my perspective on some things, I’ve worked with a new sports psychologist this year and it’s paying off.”

 

Boxer Harry Garside on his third fight at GC2018:

 

“I was a little bit tired. It’s the middle of the tournament, which I felt in my legs, but my upper body and my reflexes were on point and that’s obviously showing from the two previous fights. It’s very rare for a fighter in Australia to have so many fights in a week.”

 

Athlete Kelsey-Lee Roberts talks about her silver medal throw:

 

“It was a bit nerve-racking leaving it (my best throw) until the last round, but that is what makes the competition exciting, enjoyable and memorable.”

 

Para-athlete Marty Jackson on his performance and the inspiration behind it:

 

“It has taken me forever to put one together but today I was just in the right frame of mind. Physically I felt good.

“I’ve never thrown in front of a crowd like this before and having my 85-year-old parents, my girlfriend and all my friends come here from Geelong (in the state of Victoria), plus my three daughters at home, not bad for a 40-year-old, I’ll take that.”

 

Boxer Kaye Scott reflects on the split decision result in her bout:

 

“The result is what it is. I’m just extremely disappointed. It’s been a long preparation and a dream for a long time and it’s just come crashing to an end. I thought it was very close and I thought in that last round I might have snuck away with the win. I thought with her holding and me coming home strong in that third round it would have been enough but that’s boxing and you just have to cop it on the chin. I just want to pick myself up and be there for the team. We’ve still got a lot of other opportunities for medals so I’ll be there to support the team.”

 

Para-bowler Bob Seymour on winning gold in the mixed B2/B3 pairs:

 

“I never thought we would be anywhere near that standard. Once we found out Lynne was blind, we thought that was the end of it. And then we found out about visually impaired bowls.”

 

Para-athlete Isis Holt describes her feelings during the medal ceremony on Wednesday night:

 

“It was amazing. I’ve had some pretty good medal ceremonies in my athletics career, but that was just so powerful.

“Standing up there, hearing other Aussies singing the national anthem, I had to try hard not to cry.”

 

Athlete Henry Frayne on his performance:

 

“It was awesome and I couldn’t have asked for a better Commonwealth Games. It was an amazing crowd and electric atmosphere. I’m proud of my effort.

“I would have liked to come up over the top (won in the final round) but it was an uphill battle after the third round. My body just wasn’t competition fit for two days. I had hoped I would have put something a bit more out there.”

 

Diver James Conner talks about his six dives for the final:

 

“After round two, I remember thinking, ‘it doesn’t matter what’s on the scoreboard, just keep going’. I really enjoyed it.”

 

Gymnast Dani Prince compares winning bronze in the team event at GC2018 with winning gold at Delhi 2010:

 

“This is more special than gold in Delhi. Just considering the journey that not only I have been on, but the journey all three of us have been through to get here. It’s incredibly special.”

 

Gymnast Alexandra Kiroi-Bogatyreva talks about being new to senior international competition and the journey to her first major competition:

 

“It was a very tough journey for me, especially as this is my first year in seniors and first major competition. Having a home crowd, that’s what supported me. Just amazing.”

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